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Digital Workplace Impact

The podcast where Digital Workplace Group CEO and Founder Paul Miller investigates
and explores ideas, practices and people impacting the new digital worlds of work.

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Episode: 22

What makes Kansas City (and many other cities) so smart?

What makes Kansas City (and many other cities) so smart?

“I’m not thinking ‘smart city’ in the context of a smarter building delivering a better work experience – which is all good and I want that – but I’m thinking of the whole city as a system and how the employee and their employer can access that information to transform the work itself.”

– Gordon Feller, Meeting of the Minds

Smart cities are popping up all over the world – tackling various issues: cutting crime; reducing traffic congestion; relieving pollution levels. And while the initiatives may vary, every smart city has the same goal – to improve the lives of its citizens.

The smart city at the centre of our podcast is Kansas City, winner of the Edison Award (Gold) for “Collective Disruption” and civic innovation in 2017. We talk to Bob Bennett, Chief Innovation Officer of Kansas City, and Gordon Feller, founder of the highly influential smart city program, Meeting of the Minds, both of whom are tasked with harnessing the power of data and technology for the greater good. Bob and Gordon outline the definition of a smart city; what it takes to make a success of it; and what it means to live in a smart city.

Follow the conversation as Paul Miller asks how smart cities are changing the way we work, whether there can ever be a “smart rural” and what we can expect from our future smart cities.

Show notes, links and resources for this episode:
Meeting of the Minds
Kansas City: Edison Award (Gold) for “Collective Disruption” and civic innovation in 2017
How did Kansas City create the largest connected city block in the world? (Video)
John Snow and the cholera outbreak of 1854
Urbanova
Digital Workplace Impact: How the World Bank digitally empowers the young in developing nations


Featuring


Bob Bennett portrait

Bob Bennett, Chief Innovation Officer, Kansas City, Missouri

Bob Bennett became the Chief Innovation Officer for the City of Kansas City, Missouri, in January 2016 after a 25-year career in the US Army. He leads the Smart City initiatives, a suite of projects including: data analysis, public Wi-Fi, digital kiosk installation and smart lighting programs in the city’s downtown core. Kansas City’s initiatives earned an Edison Award (Gold) for “Collective Disruption” and civic innovation in 2017. Bob is currently working on plans to extend Smart City infrastructure throughout the 318 miles of KCMO with an emphasis on Digital Inclusion.


Gordon Feller portrait

Gordon Feller, Founder, Meeting of the Minds

Meeting of the Minds (MotM) is a unique international organization established in 2000 as a World Bank spin-off. It brings together urban sustainability and technology leaders to share knowledge and build lasting alliances. MotM is the non-profit that pioneered the smart city as a tangible goal, building partnerships with many leading corporates and foundations. MotM provides the leadership network (30,000 from more than 50 countries) with rich and original content via monthly webinars, MeetUps, conferences, reports, print magazine and daily guest blogs from city-focused innovators. Gordon formerly worked in the Cisco Systems HQ executive office as Director of Urban Innovation and still advises on the Internet of Things.

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